Women and Magical Thinking


It’s concerning  for women that they are statistically and significantly more superstitious and religious than men. All of the credible research conducted indicates that superstition or prayer does not effect the outcomes of events. Rubbing a Lucky Rabbits Foot is equally as ineffective as praying for a sick relative. And so it would seem reasonable that we never see amputees recover their missing limb or a train wreck restored no matter how much superstition or prayer is invoked.

And if you are looking for a reason for the pay inequity between the sexes the factor is the same as the difference between superstitious beliefs of the sexes; Men are paid twenty percent more and are also twenty percent less superstitious and religious than women.

Reason as you may remember is the philosophy of cause and effect. So if you are a woman you are statistically twenty percent less likely to use and believe in reason, and so trust more in magical thinking. So it’s for practicle reasons and not because of sexual discrimination for your lower pay.

It’s also noteworthy that in math and science, men win over 95% of Nobel Prizes. Its highly unlikely that this is not a reflection of the habits of female minds and is not sexism. And rubbing the rabbits foot or praying isn’t going to do a darn thing for you, and again, all the research says so and I guess this is what makes life so unfair…the quality of thought?

Advertisements

16 thoughts

  1. I don’t pray, but I do know thought – technically, what a prayer is – takes energy. So to pray or think – either way – is to give someone or something energy. Thus, maybe the purpose isn’t an end goal so much as to just share a little of yourself with another. I can not argue that adding expectation may have its disadvantages, but I always tell my very Catholic family when they say they’ve prayed for me: thank you for your energy.

  2. Hi there I’m really interested in this post as a woman. You see I’ve never really worried about the equal pay stuff and women getting Nobel Peace prizes etc although I know lots of women who do. I’m a person who enjoys life and am happy with my income with no care about what my fellow workers earn. These things I find spoil the balance of life on a more practical level. It’s easy to get wrapped up in dogma. As a Buddhist and a non believer in God as creator I agree 100% with the evidence that prayer achieves nothing (Well nothing relating to the outcome of a problem that is) It may however help the person refocus their thinking, relax the mind feeling it’s a problem shared etc. At the end of the day it seems prayer is often more about the self, ego, needs and wants rather than about God. Thank you once again Julie

  3. The problem is viewing life through the lens of a market system. Steven Pinker’s newest book talks about the ‘progress’ of the Enlightenment Age, how there are fewer people in poverty, but he ignores the inherent selection bias insomuch as much of the ‘premodern’ world had no need for income until they were dragged into the market system. Capitalism is a modern-day Crusades.

  4. Prayer and meditation aren’t the same thing. Meditation is an emersion into the moment, the source of experience itself that excludes thought(memory).

  5. The current missionary of capitalism by the US reveals its origin in Christian thought. It has all the same associated problems of the crusades of spreading the gospel of capitalism by force.

  6. Energy is a well defined and measurable phenomenon in physics. You use the term as analogy. Yet analogy is comparison between one thing and another, typically for the purpose of explanation. To call pray energy explains nothing, in contrary it adds additional confusion.
    Pray is an introverted psychological act, done to pacify stress and excitement of the mind, by turning to abstract non existing never present imaginary force,
    exogenous to the praying individual. Even if praying is done mostly within the group, it is act of submission of the individual to the authority, imaginary or the one, who claims to represent the imaginary non existing, omnipotent, ever and everywhere present entity.

  7. Pray is an introverted psychological act, done to pacify stress and excitement of the mind, by turning to abstract, non existing, never present, imaginary force,
    exogenous to the praying individual. Even if praying is done mostly within the group, it is act of submission of the individual to the authority, imaginary, or the one, who claims to represent the imaginary non existing, omnipotent, ever and everywhere present entity.

  8. Prayer has a purpose of invocation. Your theistic upbringing is showing and is revealing non Buddhist attitude. The universe is deaf and indifferent to your prayers. There is no purpose.

  9. Hi & thank you for your reply. Yes I can agree prayer & meditation aren’t the same thing & meditation is indeed the emersion into the moment. We Buddhists are always questioning and analysing things which is why I loved your post so much. Whilst meditation is an emersion into the moment, the deeper question is why are we doing it and the answer is usually for a more peaceful mind. In some senses this relates back to ego a desire to have something. Prayer whilst not being the emersion into the moment, but more a direct converstation with God, is also usually done for similar results – a more peaceful mind. So whilst I’m in no way saying the two are the same – there are fundamental similarities. What do you think? Of course there’ll be many different perspectives on this wonderful topic.

  10. If so, then why do humans have such ability. Evolution didn’t create this trait without being tested. Prayer, religion, belief is like thinking in the future, to predict the unknown.

  11. Pingback: Variations Of Self Awareness – Philosophical Meanderings

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: